The Future of International Judicial Assistance

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This post first appeared on Ted Folkman’s Letters Blogatory, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary – if you don’t know that blog yet, do check it out, it  is rightly called The Blog of International Judicial Assistance. Ted, who has been a guest on this blog, asked me to contribute some thoughts about the future of international judicial assistance (IJA). Ted’s invitation came at a time when I experience, for the first time, a step backwards in that field: The Brexit Deal between the European Union and the United Kingdom, which in my view is a “sectoral hard Brexit” for civil judicial assistance. Continue reading

ABA Journal’s Top 100 Blawgs: Call for Nominations

1213_Blawg100250There are (still) quite a few things in the United States I envy. Certainly, one of these is the thriving legal blogosphere – they have so many legal blogs over there, they even created a neologism for them: blawgs. Every year since 2007, the American Bar Association’s ABA Journal has assembled a list of their 100 favorite blawgs for the December issue.

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Federal Constitutional Court on International Judicial Co-Operation – A US Perspective

US_Supreme_Court_-_correctedOver at Letters Blogatory, Ted Folkman has picked up the decision of the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht) on judicial assistance on which I reported earlier this week. Ted found a nice name for the case, In re Frau R.*, and shared an interesting observation from a US perspective: Continue reading

The Hague Service Convention Turns 50 in 2015 – Save the Date!

Ted Folkman at Letters Blogatory, along with the Center for Transnational Business and the Law at Georgetown University Law Center, will be hosting an event to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the conclusion of the Hague Service Convention. Here is from Ted: “The event, to be held in Washington on February 19, 2015, will bring together practitioners, central authority representatives, and academics to discuss and celebrate the Convention’s legacy and to look ahead to its future.”

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