Brexit and Lugano: First Anniversary of the UK’s Application

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On 8 April 2020, the United Kingdom deposited an application to accede to the Lugano Convention, with the Swiss Federal Council, the depositary under the Convention. Acceding to the Lugano Convention as a replacement for the Brussels Regulation (recast) had emerged as the UK’s preferred strategy for judicial co-operation in civil and commercial matters (even though the European Court of Justice does have a role in the Lugano regime under Protocol 2 on the uniform interpretation of the Convention and on the Standing Committee). Continue reading

Federal Supreme Court: First Post-Brexit Decision on Procedural Issue

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To the best of my knowledge, the Federal Supreme Court (Bundesgerichtshof) decision of 1 March 2021 is the first one dealing with one of the procedural issues arising after Brexit, namely the question of security for costs to be posted by British plaintiffs in German proceedings pursuant to Section 110 German Code of Civil Procedure (Zivilprozessordnung, ZPO) if the proceedings were already pending before the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union became effective. Implicitly, the Federal Supreme Court also addresses the question of whether “old” multilateral treaties such as the 1968 Brussels Convention or bilateral treaties such as the 1960 British-German Convention were revived after Brexit. Continue reading

Hard Brexit for Judicial Cooperation: No Revival of Brussels, Rome Conventions

Given the activities of the Advisory Commission, with two recommendations and a press release on a default with a couple of weeks, the blog has been rather art law-heavy recently. So for a change, let’s revisit another recurring theme: Brexit! Over at legal twitter, Professor Steve Peers published a “thread on where we stand with EU conclusion of the Brexit deal, based on internal unpublished Council documents.” One of these documents Professor Peers shared is a letter of the UK Mission to the European Union dated 29 January 2021. It reads, in its relevant part, as follows: Continue reading

Art Law: US Supreme Court on Welfenschatz and Sovereign Immunity

Yesterday, the US Supreme Court issued its decision in Federal Republic of Germany v. Philipp (S. Ct. 2021) and today, we have Ted Folkman of Letters Blogatory reviewing it: 

This is the case of the Welfenschatz, the Guelph treasure said to have been stolen by the Nazis from its Jewish owners. The claim was that Hermann Göring, one of Hitler’s most powerful ministers, had coerced the Jewish owners of the treasure to sell it for a fraction of its value to the Prussian government in the early 1930s. Continue reading