Civil Justice and Private International Law: EU Commission Issues No-Deal Brexit Gudiance

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On 27 August 2020, the EU Commission published an updated “Notice to Stakeholders on the Withdrawal of the United Kindgom and EU Rules in the Field of Civil Justice and Private International Law”. Continue reading

Art Law After Brexit: EU Commission Guidance on Cultural Goods

Under the headline “Getting ready for the end of the transition period”, the European Commission has published guidance for stakeholders for a variety of sectors, from air transport to waste shipments. For the art business, there is a note on the import and export of cultural goods dated 17 August 2020. Continue reading

The Termination of Bilateral Investment Treaties in the EU – One Agreement to End Them All?

My colleagues Nick Storrs and Michael Wietzorek look at the EU memberstates’ exit from bi-lateral investment treaties (BITs) in the wake of the Achmea decision of the European Court of Justice. This case had several appearances on this blog, as it made its way from the Frankfurt Court of Appeals (Oberlandesgericht) and the Federal Supreme Court (Bundesgerichtshof) to the European Court of Justice, first under its original name, Slovakia v. Eureko. 

On 5 May 2020, 23 Member States of the EU entered into an Agreement for the Termination of Bilateral Investment Treaties between the Member States of the European Union (the Agreement). The Agreement will terminate any bilateral investment treaties (BITs) in force between any of Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Spain, as well as Belgium and Luxembourg, who had entered into BITs together as the Belgo-Luxembourg Economic Union.

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Brexit Update: The UK’s Negotiation Strategy

UK Breixt Feb 2020Earlier this month, when the European Commission published its draft mandate for the Brexit negotiations with the United Kingdom, I looked at what was in there regarding matters relevant to this blog, in particular at judicial cooperation in civil and commercial matters. The European Commission’s paper was silent on these topics. Today, the U.K.’s equivalent has been published, and it contains a short paragraph on the topic: Continue reading