Brexit Meets Looted Art – The Elgin Marbles And Beyond

Featured

Elgin marblesEarlier this month, we reviewed the draft directive for the EU Commission’s Brexit negotiations with the United Kingdom for matters relevant to this blog. Today, the European Commission’s negotiation mandate was confirmed. Comparing the draft version with the final mandate approved by the 27 EU member states today, there is one noticeable change.

Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

Art Law: Magdeburg Court on Deletion of Entry in Lost Art Database

Kalabrische KüsteIn a judgment of November 2019, which was reported in the press only recently, the Magdeburg District Court (Landgericht) had to decide a dispute between the current owner of a painting and the heirs of a former owner who had the painting registered in the Lost Art Database. The judgment has, in true German tradition, been published in an anonymised version. Read in conjunction with the press coverage of the dispute in The Art Newspaper, Süddeutsche or Handelsblatt, it is however easy to fill in the blanks.  Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

Art Law: German Lost Art Foundation Establishes “Help Desk”

Deutsches Zentrum KulturgutverlusteLast week, the German Lost Art Foundation (Deutsches Zentrum für Kulturgutverluste) announced that as of the beginning of this year, it has established a help desk to support victims of Nazi persecution and their descendants with enquiries regarding looted art. Here’s from the press release: Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

Towards a Restatement of Restitution Rules: Research into the International Practice of Nazi-looted Art Restitution

FPKProfessor Matthias Weller, University of Bonn,  (who has contributed to this blog in the past) hat issued the following press release about an exiting new project, which I would like to share with you:

“In April 2019, research began at the University of Bonn on international practice in the restitution of artworks stolen under the Nazi regime. Head of the research project is Prof. Dr. Matthias Weller, who holds the “Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach professorship for civil law, art and cultural property law”.

The project aims to provide a comprehensive, comparative analysis of international practice in the restitution of Nazi-looted art. It aims to establish a generalized set of rules on how decisions are made based on considerations of fairness and justice.

Continue reading

Share and Enjoy