Corona and the German Courts – A Tale in Three Acts

Featured

SARS-CoV-2_49534865371Like every other area of public life, the Corona crisis has hit the German courts with full force and did not leave it unscathed. But the reactions vary: They range from judges and courts still holding ordinary sessions and carrying on with oral hearings to courts being virtually closed except for on-call judges for very urgent matters, with standard civil and commercial matters being postponed ex offico. Three aspects of the current situation are of particular interest: Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

Brexit Update: The UK’s Negotiation Strategy

Featured

UK Breixt Feb 2020Earlier this month, when the European Commission published its draft mandate for the Brexit negotiations with the United Kingdom, I looked at what was in there regarding matters relevant to this blog, in particular at judicial cooperation in civil and commercial matters. The European Commission’s paper was silent on these topics. Today, the U.K.’s equivalent has been published, and it contains a short paragraph on the topic: Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

The Hague Judgments Convention – Should the European Union Join?

Featured

HCCH LogoLast week, the European Commission started a consultation process on the question whether the EU should join the Hague Judgments Convention (Convention of 2 July 2019 on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Civil or Commercial Matters). Here is the Commission’s summary: Continue reading

Share and Enjoy

Cases of the Week: How (Not) To Bundle Claims

Featured

Landgericht BraunschweigGermany does not have US style class actions. The introduction of the Capital Market Investors’ Model Proceeding Act (Kapitalanlegermusterverfahrensgesetz, KapMuG) in 2005 (triggered by the Deutsche Telekom securities litigation) and of the Model Declaratory Proceedings (Musterfeststellungsklage) that were added to the German Code of Civil Procedure (ZPO) in November 2018 in order to address the wave of Diesel litigation have not really changed that. In the assessment of the plaintiffs’ bar, Germany’s legal tools for seeking collective redress are still not fit for purpose. Continue reading

Share and Enjoy