Remember Brexit? News From Lugano

Lugano_from_SighignolaWith all legal and non-legal news monothematically being dominated by Covid-19 and its implications, it appears that everyone has lost sight of Brexit – I certainly almost have. It is mid-May now, and the 30 June 2020 deadline for the United Kingdom to request an extension of the transition period beyond 2020 is fast approaching. At this point in time, it looks as if, Covid-19 and its impact notwithstanding, no such request will be made and the transition period will expire as currently scheduled on 31 December 2020, deal or no deal. Time to look into alternatives then… the 2007 Lugano Convention on Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments in Civil and Commercial Matters might be one, as a substitute to the Brussels I Recast RegulationContinue reading

Corona and the German Courts – A Tale in Three Acts

SARS-CoV-2_49534865371Like every other area of public life, the Corona crisis has hit the German courts with full force and did not leave it unscathed. But the reactions vary: They range from judges and courts still holding ordinary sessions and carrying on with oral hearings to courts being virtually closed except for on-call judges for very urgent matters, with standard civil and commercial matters being postponed ex offico. Three aspects of the current situation are of particular interest: Continue reading

Brexit Update: The UK’s Negotiation Strategy

UK Breixt Feb 2020Earlier this month, when the European Commission published its draft mandate for the Brexit negotiations with the United Kingdom, I looked at what was in there regarding matters relevant to this blog, in particular at judicial cooperation in civil and commercial matters. The European Commission’s paper was silent on these topics. Today, the U.K.’s equivalent has been published, and it contains a short paragraph on the topic: Continue reading