The Hague Judgments Convention – A Game Changer? Conference, Milan, 23 April 2020

42A5753D-828D-4E49-992D-B85FBBF66C76On 23 April 2020, the Catholic University of Milan will host a conference on the Hague Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Civil or Commercial Matters, or Hague Judgments Convention for short. The Convention was adopted on 2 July 2019 by the delegates of the 22nd Diplomatic Session of the Hague Conference on Private International Law (HCCH). Continue reading

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What Else Happened in November

Robert BoyleThis month, we had three cases of the week: First, we looked at German Brexit-related cases. The second case dealt with the pitfalls that translations can create under the EU Service Regulation and finally, we reported on the U-turn of the Munich Court of Appeals on the right time for the judicial review of arbitrator appointments. And here’s a recap of other recent developments: Continue reading

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7th Symposium Law Made in Germany, 6 November 2019, Frankfurt – Commercial Courts

Law Made in germanyThe “Law Made in Germany” initiative is seeking to promote the use of German law in international business transactions. The initiative is largely a reaction to a similar initiative of the Law Society in England & Wales. Continue reading

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The Month in Retrospect: What Else Happend in May

Robert BoyleThe Future is Female

In 2017, for the first time, a majority (52%) of lawyers newly admitted to the German bar were women, data published at the Anwaltstag showed. One could see this coming, as female law students have outnumbered men for quite a while. Overall, 34.7% of lawyers are women, and their share has been constantly rising for years: In 1970, only 4.5% of all lawyers were women. Their share rose to 7.6% in 1980, on to 15.1% in 1990, 24.6% in 2000 and in 2010, the female part of the profession accounted for 31.6%.

 

Lawyers Stick to Their Robes

The rule-setting body (Satzungsversammlung) of the German Federal Bar (Bundesrechtsanwaltskammer) convened in early May. One item on the agenda was a proposal to abolish the duty of lawyers to wear a robe in court. A majority one can oly describe as overwhelming rejected the proposal: 70 members voted against, only two memers were in favour of the reform. I personally quite like the ritual of putting on the robe before a hearing, and I would like to believe that it helps see you as of their kind, in our role of officers of the court (Organ der Rechtspflege).

The illustration is taken from  the front page of Robert Boyle’s collcetion of essays (2nd Edition, London 1669).

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