Judicial Cooperation in Civil Matters: Hard Brexit After All?

During the course of the morning, leaked versions of the draft Brexit treaty and accompanying documents started to appear on legal @twitter, only to be followed by the official publications by both the UK government and the EU Commission. I have now had an initial look at what the documents say regarding judicial cooperation in civil matters. Spoiler alert: Radio silence on this topic. Continue reading

Remember Brexit? News From Lugano

Lugano_from_SighignolaWith all legal and non-legal news monothematically being dominated by Covid-19 and its implications, it appears that everyone has lost sight of Brexit – I certainly almost have. It is mid-May now, and the 30 June 2020 deadline for the United Kingdom to request an extension of the transition period beyond 2020 is fast approaching. At this point in time, it looks as if, Covid-19 and its impact notwithstanding, no such request will be made and the transition period will expire as currently scheduled on 31 December 2020, deal or no deal. Time to look into alternatives then… the 2007 Lugano Convention on Jurisdiction and the Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments in Civil and Commercial Matters might be one, as a substitute to the Brussels I Recast RegulationContinue reading

The Hague Judgments Convention: Prospects for Judicial Cooperation in Civil Matters between the EU and Third Countries, Bonn, 25 and 26 September 2020

Uni Bonn LogoIn this guest post, Matthias Weller of Bonn University introduces a conference on a topic at the very heart of this blog, The Hague Judgments Convention.

Brexit has become reality – one more reason to think about the EU’s Judicial Cooperation with third states:

The largest proportion of EU economic growth in the 21st century is expected to arise in trade with third countries. This is why the EU is building up trade relations with many states and other regional integration communities in all parts of the world. The latest example is the EU-MERCOSUR Association Agreement concluded on 28 June 2019. With the United Kingdom’s exit of the Union on 31 January 2020, extra-EU trade with neighboring countries will further increase in importance. Another challenge for the EU is China’s “Belt and Road Initiative”, a powerful global development strategy that includes overland as well as sea routes in more than 100 states around the globe. Continue reading

Hague Choice of Court Convention, United Kingdom and Brexit: Withdrawal Agreement Triggers Withdrawal

hcch logoAcceding to the Hague Choice of Court Convention is one of the unilateral steps the United Kingdom is planning to take to partially close the gap that will open in the field of judicial cooperation when the Brussels Regulation falls away upon Brexit.

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