Human Rights Day 2019: Standing Up for Human Rights

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write for rights 2019Today is Human Rights Day. It commemorates the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted, in 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: A milestone document proclaiming the inalienable rights which everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Available in more than 500 languages, it is the most translated document in the world.” Continue reading

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Case of the Week: Does Facebook understand German?

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OLG München 2The question whether Facebook understands German came before the Court of Appeals (Oberlandesgericht) München in the context of Article 8 of the European Service Regulation. Pursuant to this provision, the addressee of a document

“may refuse to accept the document to be served at the time of service or by returning the document to the receiving agency within one week if it is not written in, or accompanied by a translation into, either of the following languages: (a) a language which the addressee understands; or (b) the official language of the Member State addressed or, if there are several official languages in that Member State, the official language or one of the official languages of the place where service is to be effected.” Continue reading

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What Else Happened in November

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Robert BoyleThis month, we had three cases of the week: First, we looked at German Brexit-related cases. The second case dealt with the pitfalls that translations can create under the EU Service Regulation and finally, we reported on the U-turn of the Munich Court of Appeals on the right time for the judicial review of arbitrator appointments. And here’s a recap of other recent developments: Continue reading

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Case of the Week: When is the Right Time for a Court Review of Arbitrator Appointments?

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OLG MünchenIn arbitral proceedings, the jurisdiction of the state courts is limited (Section 1026 Code of Civil Procedure; Zivilprozessordnung, ZPO). On the one hand, while the arbitral proceedings are ongoing, the courts have powers to assist during the arbitral proceedings by deciding on the appointment and the challenge of arbitrators (Sec 1035 to 1039 ZPO). They can also to step in where the arbitral tribunal lacks jurisdiction and support the taking of evidence (Section 1050 ZPO). On the other hand, the state courts are competent to review the legality of the arbitral proceedings and the award once the proceedings have been concluded (Section 1059 ZPO).

The issue before the Munich Court of Appeals (Oberlandesgericht) earlier this year was whether a dispute between parties to an arbitration about the effectiveness of an arbitrator’s appointment can be decided during the arbitral proceedings on the basis of Sec 1035 para. 4 ZPO, or whether such a decision has to wait until the arbitral proceedings have been concluded and an award has been made.

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Case of the Week: To Translate or not to Translate? – Pitfalls under the EU Service Regulation

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LaPoste-Briefkasten (1)Until recently, a lawyer issuing proceedings in a German court against a foreign party could, as a matter of principle, assume that she had done everything necessary to suspend the statute of limitations or otherwise comply with an applicable time limit if two requirements were met: First, she had to file the statement of claim (Klageschrift) with the court in good time. Secondly, upon the court’s request the claimant had to immediately pay the advance on court as well as an advance on costs, if any, for a translation for service abroad. If these requirements were met. then service was deemed to have taken place on the date of filing the statement of claim with the court pursuant to Section 167 ZPO (Zivilprozessordnung; Code of Civil Procedure). Continue reading

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