Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements Comes Into Force

HCCH LogoOn October 1, 2015, the Hague Convention of 30 June 2005 on Choice of Court Agreements came into force in 28 States, namely in Mexico and all member states of the European Union – with the traditional exception of Denmark, which continues its isolationist policy in jurisdictional matters. The Convention thus comes into force a little over 10 years after it was signed in 2005, as the result of the European Union’s approval earlier this year. It remains to be seen whether its entry into force creates some momentum amongst other states to follow. From a European perspective, the United States’ ratification would have the biggest practical impact. Continue reading

European Union: Progress on the Choice of Court Convention

The headline of Friday’s press release was a bit too much, for my taste: “Choice of Court Convention: EU businesses receive a major boost for international trade”, the EU Commission claimed. EU Justice Commissioner Martine Reicherts hailed the Court Convention as “a great example of how justice policy serves to boost economic growth and job creation by creating the right conditions for European businesses to flourish in their trading with non-European Partners.”

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Update from The Hague: Special Commission on the Practical Operation of the Service, Evidence and Access to Justice Conventions

Update: As previously reported,  the Hague Conference on Private International Law is holding a Special Commission meeting on the Service, Evidence and Access to Justice Conventions. At Letters Blogatory, Ted Folkman has now posted his comments of days three and four of the proceedings in The Hague.

The Hague: Special Commission on the Practical Operation of the Service, Evidence and Access to Justice Conventions

This week, the Hague Conference on Private International Law is holding a meeting of the Special Commission on the Practical Operation of the Service, Evidence and Access to Justice Conventions. At Letters Blogatory, Ted Folkman is reporting live as events unfold. The Hague Conventions of course are central to many elements of cross-border litigation, and Ted covers what changes are being discussed.

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